CRISTALLOIDI E COLLOIDI PDF

The Colloid Crystalloid Question • Is one of the oldest. • Basic yet fundamental question. • The first intervention given. • To every patient. • Often several litres. A volume expander is a type of intravenous therapy that has the function of providing volume There are two main types of volume expanders: crystalloids and colloids. Crystalloids are aqueous solutions of mineral salts or other water- soluble. Colloids and crystalloids are types of fluids that are used for fluid replacement, often intravenously (via a tube straight into the blood).

Author: Fenrill Daizragore
Country: Gambia
Language: English (Spanish)
Genre: Travel
Published (Last): 27 August 2007
Pages: 210
PDF File Size: 8.8 Mb
ePub File Size: 14.76 Mb
ISBN: 933-9-91822-504-7
Downloads: 23656
Price: Free* [*Free Regsitration Required]
Uploader: Dall

Twenty-eight studied starch solutions, cristalloidii dextrans, seven gelatins, and 22 albumin or fresh frozen plasma FFP ; each type of colloid was compared to crystalloids. A volume expander is a type of intravenous therapy that has the function of providing volume for the circulatory system.

These adaptations are so effective that if only half of the red blood cells remain, oxygen delivery may still be ctistalloidi 75 percent of normal. Colloids have larger molecules, cost more, and may provide swifter volume expansion in the intravascular space, but may induce allergic reactions, blood clotting disorders, and kidney failure. Crystalloids fluids such as normal saline typically have a balanced electrolyte composition and expand total extracellular volume.

Dextrans versus crystalloids We found moderate-certainty evidence that there is probably little or no difference between using dextrans or crystalloids in mortality at: No studies measured RRT. Evidence for blood transfusion was very low certainty 3 studieswith a low event rate or data not reported by intervention. The body detects the lower hemoglobin level, and compensatory mechanisms start up.

Recent work has demonstrated that new generations of HES have a good safety profile, but their routine use in the perioperative setting has not been demonstrated to confer outcome benefit. Data for RRT were not reported separately for gelatins 1 study. We searched the medical literature and identified 69 relevant studies with 30, critically ill participants who were given fluid replacement in hospital or in an emergency out-of-hospital setting. Conclusions Using colloids starches; dextrans; or albumin or FFP compared to crystalloids for fluid replacement probably makes little or no difference to the number of critically ill people who die.

  BIAMP MXA150 PDF

The evidence is current to February We found moderate-certainty evidence that using colloids starches; dextrans; or albumin or FFP compared to crystalloids for fluid replacement probably makes little or no difference to cristalolidi number of critically ill people who die within 30 or 90 days, or by cristtalloidi end of study follow-up.

Starches versus crystalloids We found moderate-certainty evidence that there is probably little or no difference between using starches or crystalloids in mortality at: We found moderate-certainty evidence that there is probably little or no difference between using dextrans or crystalloids in mortality at: Participants had a range of conditions typical of critical illness.

We noted risk of selection bias in some studies, and, as most studies were not prospectively registered, risk of selective outcome reporting. We compared a colloid suspended in any crystalloid solution versus a crystalloid isotonic or hypertonic. Physiological dissociation is approximately 1.

Crystalloids have small molecules, are cheap, easy to use, and provide immediate cristalloiid resuscitation, but may increase oedema. Retrieved from ” https: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. We found little or no difference in allergic reactions RR 6. Similarly, evidence for adverse events is uncertain.

Ringer’s lactate or Ringer’s acetate is another isotonic solution often used for large-volume fluid replacement. Starches probably increase the need for blood transfusion and renal replacement therapy slightly. Of note crystalloids are significantly cheaper than colloids.

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. We are uncertain whether they are better than crystalloids at reducing death, need for blood collooidi or need for renal replacement therapy filtering the blood, with or without dialysis machines, if kidneys fail when given to critically ill people who need fluid replacement.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. When blood is lost, the greatest immediate need is to stop further blood loss. We found little or no difference between starches or crystalloids in allergic reactions, but fewer participants given crystalloids reported itching or rashes. JAMA Nov 6; We are uncertain whether using dextrans, albumin or FFP, or crystalloids affects the need for blood transfusion.

  ETON PA 2802 PDF

Crystalloid or colloid: does it matter?

Gelofusine is a crishalloidi volume expander that is used as colloid blood plasma replacement if a significant amount of blood is lost due to extreme hemorrhagiatrauma, dehydration, or a similar event. Theoretical advantages of using hydroxyethyl starch HES for goal-directed therapy include a reduction in the total volume of fluid required, resulting in less tissue oedema. We are uncertain whether either fluid type reduces need for blood transfusion RR 1.

Fourteen studies included participants in the crystalloid group who received or may have received colloids, which might have influenced results. Studies compared colloids starches; dextrans; gelatins; or albumin or FFP with crystalloids.

Volume expander

We found moderate-certainty evidence that using starches for fluid replacement probably slightly increases the need for renal replacement therapy. Albumin or FFP versus crystalloids We found moderate-certainty evidence that there is probably little or no difference between crostalloidi albumin or FFP or using crystalloids in mortality at: With enough blood loss, ultimately red blood cell levels drop too low for adequate tissue oxygenation, even if volume expanders cristallpidi circulatory volume.

We found moderate-certainty evidence that using starches probably slightly increases the need for blood transfusion. No difference in the incidence of postoperative complications was seen between the groups. Intravenous sugar solutionssuch as with glucose also called dextrosehave the advantage of providing some energy, and may thereby provide the entire or part of the energy component of parenteral nutrition.

In the acute setting, you can replace blood loss with an equal volume of colloid solutions; however, as the half-life of all colloids is relatively short, patients will eventually require a greater volume of colloid solutions — nearly as great as would be required for a crystalloid resuscitation.

This is roughly 4 times more concentrated than medical “normal saline” of 0. Colloid or crystalloid solutions may be used for this purpose.